Tag Archives: portrait

Young girl holding fresh picked coffee cherries in Vanuatu.

Vanuatu coffee

It surprised me to see three brands of Vanuatu grown coffee for sale in Luganville. Alongside the well-known Tanna coffee there was a selection from Aore Island and a haphazard collection of different bags branded as Cafe de Vanuatu. I found the origins of this coffee at VARTC ( Vanuatu Agricultural Research Technical Centre ),10km north of Luganville.

The VARTC farm is quite compact and it did not take long to find children on school holidays picking the arabica beans (30 Vatu for 1kg or about 40c NZ ). From picking to roasting, the whole operation is done by hand.

With a new wharf being built in Luganville and more cruise ships visiting it would be an ideal time to package the operation for tourists in a similar way to Tanna Coffee in Efate.

In the meantime you will have to buy the very good quality arabica beans at LCM ( the best supermarket in Luganville ), I just hope the branding gets some love.

Click an image to view slideshow.

 

 

 

Five bottles of Good Buzz kombucha photographed in studio.

GoodBuzz in Wainuiomata

Kombucha, booch and SCOBY are new words in my vocab after a visit to photograph the GoodBuzz soft drink factory in Wainuiomata.

The GoodBuzz process combines sugar, tea and water (from the Te Puna Wai Ora artesian aquifer in Petone) with the SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) and turns into an effervescent, healthy, non-alcoholic  drink.

In the short time GoodBuzz has been operating they already have  five kombucha brews in more than 60 cafes in Wellington, Christchurch, Hawkes Bay, New Plymouth and Nelson, and recently have been included in Auckland’s Nosh outlets.

The drinks come in five flavours – Origins, Green Jasmin, Lemon and Ginger, Jade Dew and Feijoia. A new brew made with coffee cherry (the outer red skin of  discarded coffee beans from  Go Bang in Petone)  with an amazing light apple flavour is coming soon.

Each  brew takes 8-10 days to ferment and another 7-10 days of bottle conditioning before heading out the door. The best before date is four months unchilled (a bonus when there is space restrictions in the fridge), and can be extended to nine months if refrigerated.

Another buzz emanating from the factory came from discovering owner Alex Campbell and I grew up in the same small Northland town – Kaikohe. This is where Alex’s first memories of kombucha came from – his grandmother Amy made what she called Manchurian Mushroom tea in the 1970’s. Kaikohe Kombucha – who would have thought?

Click on any image for slideshow

 

Portrait of man holding a Maketu pie in front of advertising design.

More to Maketu than Masterchef | Murray Lloyd Photography

It is no surprise Maketu produced the latest MasterChef winners, the town has food in its bones. Maketu was named after the origonal kumara growing fields in Hawaiki by Te Arawa when their canoe landed at the mouth of the Kaituna River in 1340.

The river and estuary have been historically referred to as the “food bowl” of the Te Arawa. 400 years later the Robin White painting Fish and Chips, Maketu immortalised the local fish and chip shop. Not sure why the shop has not been given the Robin White treatment.

Maketu Pies carry on the food vibe. They distribute pies all over the North Island and have recently introduced a gourmet range called Sunday’s Best. Their standard range is well regarded and includes a highly rated mussel pie.

Historically the estuary provided a diverse range of seafood including pipi, koterotero (sea-anenome), tuangi (cockles), flounder, titiko (mud snail), mussels,  pāua, pūpū, scallops, kukuroa (horse mussels) and fish. It seems appropriate the winners of MasterChef Karena and Kasey Bird are described as “seafood loving sisters”  and their signature dish is paua ravioli.

Photo of Robin White painting "fish and chips, Maketu".

Fish and chip shop in Maketu, New Zealand.Maketu pies inside fridge.Portrait of man holding a Maketu pie in front of advertising design.

Harvesting clams at Blueskin Bay.

Fresh live clams from NZ to USA | Murray Lloyd Photography

Working every day of the year, the team at Dunedin’s Southern Clams can have an average of 4.5 tonnes of clams ready for market in six hours. In winter the team in the water harvest by torchlight and even have waves crashing over them on occasions.

Director Roger Belton started Southern Clams in the early 1980’s after his French girlfriend took him to experience the French food culture. Eighty percent of the clams are exported, particulary to the east coast of the USA where the large Italian poplulation need them for Spagetti alle Vonglole. The remaining clams are sold domestically at restaurants, wholesalers and the New World and Pak n Save supermarkets.

Southern Clams take sustainability very seriously even investing in forestry in order to be carbon accountable. They have never harvested their full quota of clams and are contantly looking for new ways to reduce bycatch. You can read more here

I was just thankful my waders didn’t leak. Southern clams barge loaded in mist.loading up clam shells in Dunedin

Clam shells being returned to seafloor from boat.
Shells and other by catch from the clam harvest are returned to seabed
Clam harvester being taken from boat.
The unique clam harvesters have been designed by Southern Clams
Harvesting clams in Blueskin Bay
Harvesting only takes 50% of the clams in a given area

Harvesting clams in Blueskin Bay

Harvesting clams in Dunedin Harbour.

Portrait of Roger Belton, owner of Southern Clams, standing in sea.
Roger Belton, Managing Director of Southern Clams
Red bags of clams on seafloor
Red onion bags make the clams easy to spot
Southern Clams
Harvest is highly controlled – this computer screen shows the Southern Clams underwater “paddocks” in Blueskin Bay.
Close up look at Blueskin Bay Clams.
Blueskin Bay Clams
Harvesting clams at Blueskin Bay.
The crew is very loyal – Tane Gray (third from left) has been with Southern Clams since 1995

Loading sacks of clams in Blueskin Bay.

Loading sacks of clams in Blueskin Bay.
Colin McShane loads up.

Freshly harvested clams on barge at Blueskin Bay, New Zealand

Fully loaded barge of fresh clams at Blueskin Bay.
A barge is used at Blueskin bay

Roger Belton, Managing Director at Southern Clams on small outboard boat.

Close up look at clam recruitment.
Recruitment
Clams at Blueskin Bay, New Zealand.
Blueskin Bay

Clams being sorted in factory

Clams being shucked for chowder.
Clams being shucked for chowder.
Whiteboard of clam sizes.
The smallest clams are exported to Italians in the US for their Spagetti alle vonglole

Sorting fresh clams for exportSorting fresh clams for export

Bags of fresh clams ready for export.
Live fresh clams have a shelf life of 12 days if stored correctly
Portrait of Andrew Stroonbergen, owner of Waikane Butchery standing holding sausages.

Waikanae Butchery goes mobile | Murray Lloyd Photography

 After two years of planning the big day has arrived and Andrew Stroonbergen and Peter Hedgecock load up Waikanae Butchery’s brand new Fiat Ducato Maxi van. The van was built in Holland and shipped to NZ so Andrew can supply his great produce to Wellington’s Chaffers Market on Sundays. Now, following an invitation from Joanne Welch at Summerset Retirement Village, Andrew drives his van around four retirement villages on the Kapiti Coast each Friday supplying the good folk with  lovely fresh meat and his famous smallgoods.

Waikane Butcher mobile van.Waikane Butcher mobile van.Butcher loading fresh meat in the Waikane Butcher mobile vanClose up photo of terrine and salamis for Waikanae Butcher's mobile van.Loading the Waikane Butcher mobile van.Loading the Waikane Butcher mobile van.Customer being served at the Waikane Butcher mobile van.Andrew talking to customer about the Waikane Butcher mobile van.Waikane Butcher Mobile Van driving along road.

Waikane Butcher Mobile Van parking.

Customers shopping for fresh veges in open air market.

Customers waiting at the Waikane Butcher Mobile Van.

Andrew weighing meat in the Waikane Butcher Mobile Van.

Andrew serving customer from the Waikane Butcher Mobile Van.

Andrew exchanging sausages for bananas at market.

Portrait of Andrew Stroonbergen holding his famous pork sausages
Andrew with his famous pork sausages
Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New Zealand

Stop at the Bus stop Cafe | Murray Lloyd Photography

The bus came from Kahuna in Taranaki and Kirsty Green came from the café scene in Wellington – they are now united in the front yard of a Te Horo property she owns.

Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New Zealand

Opened in May 2012 the beachy Bus Stop Café was buzzing the morning I visited. The delicious food is all homemade and the superb coffee would make you think you were in Wellington – at least 30 disappeared out the door in the short time I was photographing – along with all of the jam donuts and a pile of cheese puffs.

The message clearly is – arrive early.

Friands at the Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandHello dolly slice at Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandCheese Puffs at Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBlueberry muffins at Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New Zealand

Open from 9-4 Fri-Sun the café even has eftpos however you don’t need to pay for the very convivial atmosphere Kirsty and her sidekick Sarah conjure up.

Sarah Main and Kirsty Green

Bus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandBus Stop Cafe in Te Horo, New ZealandOne visitor whispered to me “since she arrived she’s really brought the community together you know”.

The not so secret Bus Stop Café is at 50 Dixon St, Te Horo Beach. The latest news is the cafe has reopened somewher close by. I will update as soon as I can.

Tootsie Iriha and Queenie Rikihana at Ruth Pretty wellington on a plate event.

Wellington on a Plate Pipi Trail | Murray Lloyd Photography

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Queenie Rikihana and Ruth Pretty welcome guests at Rangiatea Church
Queenie Rikihana and Ruth Pretty welcome guests at Rangiatea Church
Queenie Rikihana explains history of Rangiatea grounds
Queenie explains history of the Rangiatea grounds
Andre Baker explains the hammerhead shark design in the kneeler cushions in Rangiatea Church
Andre Baker explains the hammerhead shark design in the kneeler cushions in Rangiatea Church
...and teaches the guests to sing this song
…and teaches the guests to sing this song
No pipi but there was a John Dory
No pipi but there was a John Dory
Elaine Bevan explains weaving at Te Whare Toi in Otaki
Elaine Bevan explains weaving at Te Whare Toi in Otaki
...that's me in the foreground
…that’s me in the foreground…at Raukawa Marae
Rewana bread ready to go at Raukawa Marae in Otaki
Rewana bread ready to go at Raukawa
Marae in Otaki
Pipi fritters
Ruth Pretty’s Pipi Fritters

Wellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Tootsie Iriha's fried bread...with butter and golden syrup, yum
Tootsie Iriha’s fried bread…with butter and golden syrup, yum

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Queenie Rikihana gives tips about fishing up pipis
Queenie Rikihana gives tips about fishing up pipis

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Ruth Pretty looks forward to Tootsie Iriha's famous fried bread
Ruth looks forward to Tootsie Iriha’s famous fried bread
Tootsie Iriha and Queenie Rikihana
Tootsie Iriha and Queenie Rikihana

Wellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Aunty Hira flips her very delicate pikelets
Aunty Hira flips her very delicate pikelets
Ruth Pretty hands out Rewana bread starter to guests as they leave
Ruth hands out Rewana bread starter to guests as they leave
Portrait of Ray Lilley from Whiterock Olives in Martinborough.

Martinborough Olive Harvest Fest | Murray Lloyd Photography

Sign advertising Martinborough Olive Festival

Helen Meehan explains Olivo Oil at Martinborough Hotel
Helen Meehan explains Olivo Oil at one of the long lunches which opened the Olive Harvest Festival at Martinborough Hotel
Olivo Oils served at Martinborough Hotel.
Olivo Oils served at Martinborough Hotel

Guests dining at Martinborough Hotel as part of olive harvest festival.

Tirohana Estate, Martinborough.
Tirohana Estate
Peter and Ruth Graham from Atutahi at Tirohana Estate.
Peter and Ruth Graham from Atutahi at Tirohana Estate
Lamb Cutlets poached in Tuscan Blend Olive Oil (from Atutahi) with baby potatoes, cherry tomatoes, gremolata of hazelnut, mint, lemon and parsley.
Lamb Cutlets poached in Tuscan Blend Olive Oil (from Atutahi) with baby potatoes, cherry tomatoes, gremolata of hazelnut, mint, lemon and parsley photographed in situ at Tirohana Estate

Peter Graham talks to guests at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival

Poppies Restaurant, Martinborough, New Zealand.
Poppies Martinborough
Margaret and Mike Hanson from Blue Earth Olive Oil,  photographed at Poppies Martinborough
Margaret and Mike Hanson from Blue Earth Olive Oil, photographed at Poppies Martinborough
A dessert at Poppies Restaurant, Creme Inglesa with Barcelona inspired Trifle .
The dessert at Poppies was Creme Inglesa, Barcelona inspired Trifle (Blue Earth Olive Oil was in the bottom layer). Photographed in situ at Poppies.
Jared Gulian with his newly published book Moon over Martinborough.
Jared Gulian with his newly published book Moon over Martinborough
International Olive Oil Judge Margaret Edwards explains how to taste olive oil.
International Olive Oil Judge Margaret Edwards explains how to judge olive oil at the Olive Oil Masterclass

Guests smelling olive oil at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.Guests tasting olive oil at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.

Margaret Edwards helps blend individual oils for the class to take home.
Margaret Edwards helps blend individual oils for the class to take home
Martinborough Hotel at night.
Martinborough Hotel from the Night Market
Night Market at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.
Martinborough Olive Harvest festival Night Market

Visitors at Night Market at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.

The Olivo crew at Martinborough Olive Harvest night market.
The Olivo crew at the night market
Misty landscape at Martinborough.
A cool one degrees Sunday morning ready to harvest by hand
Ray Lilley of Whiterock Olives holding fresh olives.
Ray Lilley of White Rock Olives
Young girl picking olives in morning sunlight.
Picking at White Rock Olives

Picking olives at White Rock Olives in Martinborough.Picking olives at White Rock Estate in Martinborough.

Nalini Baruch giving cooking demonstration at Lot 8, Martinborough.
Nalini Baruch presented gourmet salad dressings the at Lot 8 commercial kitchen

Narlini Baruch giving a cooking demonstration at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival

Orange slices with sea salt and Lot Eight 2013 Aromatic Olice Oil.
Nalini Baruch’s Orange slices with sea salt and Lot Eight 2013 Aromatic Olive Oil

Close up photo of hands holding green olives in sun.

Village Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes Bay

From Olives to Oil in 12 Hrs | Murray Lloyd Photography

Gleaming olive-green Italian made machines greeted me as I was introduced to the factory by Nathan Casey, Operations Manager of Hawkes Bay’s Village Press Olive Oil.

Village Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes Bay.

500 – 600 tonnes of olives delivered to the factory each season come from 60,000 Hawkes Bay trees and are processed according to the variety of cultivar – Barnea, Frantoio, and Manzanillo are the three I am most familiar with.

Village Press Olive OilOlives from Village Press

12 years ago, Wayne and Maureen Startup started making olive oil under the brand Village Press. Today they are New Zealand’s largest producers of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, processing enough olives to make more than 100,000 litres of the golden liquid each year.

Village Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes BayVillage Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes BayVillage Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes BayVillage Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes BayVillage Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes Bay

Once the oil is extracted the remaining finely ground by-product is destined for kitty litter and is also being trialled as dairy cow feed (mixed in with other things).

Village Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes Bay

Al Brown, Ruth Pretty and Peta Mathias get their own branded oil from Village Press who bottle, label and pack the oil at the factory. Nathan also showed me newly labelled bottles with a big red heart destined for collaboration with the Returned Services Association.

Village Press Olive Oil factory in Hawkes Bay

You can find bottles and boxes of Village Press oil in New Zealand easily enough and the distinctive oils can also be purchased internationally via Amazon and Shopping Moa.

Nathan Casey and Peter Smith from Village Press Olive Oil, in Hawkes Bay
Nathan Casey and Peter Smith